Quadrophenia U.S. Tour 1973
Introduction by Joe McMichael

November 1973 ...... Like thousands of Who fans in the Chicago area, I had anxiously awaited the new album from The Who. We were richly rewarded with Quadrophenia, the magnum opus about a mod kid named Jimmy in London in 1964/1965. Although any double album has quite a lot of material to ingest, Quadrophenia is the four sided story of Jimmy's pursuit of his own identity, and among other events, where that identity fits in to the then ongoing Mod movement in Britain. I followed the tale through those four vinyl sides, absorbed by the story and the Who's majestic performances.

When the tour was announced I was elated to see Chicago on the itinerary. Tickets were available through mail order only and I sent in my order the first day they were on sale. I was on top of the world when the tickets arrived.

Thursday, November 29th. A good friend who had never seen the band went with me as we made our way down to the decrepit International Ampitheatre. We found our seats in the north balcony, about half way back from the stage. The Ampitheatre was no place for music and much of Lynyrd Skynyrd's supporting set was lost in the cavernous reaches of the venue. Then on came The Who; opening with "Can't Explain" set the stage for the show as the band was obviously "on" this night. (Pete later said he thought Chicago and Montreal were the two solidest performances of the tour.)

You could almost feel the wind on your face and smell the salty air when the sound effects were heard through the massive Heil PA system. Roger gave one of the best shows I'd ever seen, swinging his microphone in wide arcs, sometimes out over the front row of the audience! The whole band seemed to be reaching for something special that night and The Who on a good night, no a great night, was simply untouchable.

Closing the show with "Won't Get Fooled Again", they exited the stage despite a prolonged and deafening call from the crowd for an encore. We had seen an incedible show and we knew it. The Who would not come back to Chicago for two more years.

The Concert File
by Joe McMichael & 'Irish' Jack Lyons

This book is a "must" have for any Who fan. Details hundreds of concerts by The Who from the early days until the Quadrophenia concerts in 1997.

Read a personal review
by Chris Charlesworth.

Click here to order your copy





Keith with Dougal Butler.
Logan International Airport, Boston, 1973.




Red Floodlight

November 20th, 1973
Cow Palace,
San Francisco




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
The Punk And The Godfather
I'm One, Helpless Dancer
5.15, Sea And Sand
Drowned, Bell Boy
Doctor Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Magic Bus
See Me Feel Me
Smokestack Lightning
Spoonful
Naked Eye


Bill Graham Presents The Who at The Cow Palace








The Cow Palace is located in Brisbane a suburb of San Francisco.



Thumbnail Map of Cow Palace Directions

View Directions to the Cow Palace


Cow Palace Seating Chart

View Seating Chart at the Cow Palace




Sound Samples
from the Cow Palace Show

Sound samples coming soon!



Film Samples
from the Cow Palace Show

Film samples coming soon!




Concert Notes:

The band crashed into the song (Won't Get Fooled Again), but after only a few bars, Keith Moon slumped over his drums ...The roadies carried him backstage into the dressing room, where he was placed in a cold shower and revived... After another half-hour's delay, the Who once more hit the stage. Moon proclaimed himself fit, and the rest of the band tried valiantly to pick up where they'd left off. But Moon was too weak to continue - he didn't even get through the first song. He was taken backstage and then to the hospital ... Meanwhile, Townshend was enraged that the beginning of the tour was so disastrous. 'Hey,' he shouted to the crowd. 'Can anybody out there play drums? I mean good. Any takers come up here onstage.' Scott Halpin, a nineteen-year-old ..., fought his way over to the security guards and tried to talk his way onstage... 'It all happened really quick,' Halpin told Rolling Stone. 'I didn't have time to think about it and get nervous.' Townshend introduced him (as 'Scott'), called for Naked Eye, giving Halpin the time signature, and they were off. The Who ran through two other songs, "Magic Bus" and "My Generation," before finishing." Scott said after the show that "I only played three numbers and I was dead", there energy was staggering.

The Concert File notes:

The 1973 North American tour got off to an inauspicious start when Keith collapsed on stage during 'Won't Get Fooled Again'. He was carried off, revived in a shower backstage and given a short break before he rejoined the rest of the group who had carried on as a trio. Then he collapsed again, not to return.

Although considered a disaster area in terms of Who concerts, it should be emphasised that much of the music played during the early stages of the show was very good. Particularly notable was 'The Real Me' where John Entwistle's careering bass lines gave the song a manic energy. Quadrophenia progressed well until 'Drowned', which got into the middle solo section before Moon started to flag. The song was completed, however, and Keith then managed to give 'Bell Boy' his usual panache, amending the chorus lyric to "get the fucking baggage out!" Moon's drumming ceased entirely during 'Won't Get Fooled Again' where he failed to complete the solo passage towards the end. With Moon backstage, Pete tried to explain to the audience that there was a problem, concluding by saying: "The 'orrible truth is that without him we're not a group!"

While Pete was standing guitar-less at his mike, Moon reappeared from the left of the stage and Pete then grabbed him and hauled him into the stage centre. Townshend and Moon then grappled for a few moments until Pete - holding Keith in a mock wrestling hold - pulled the ailing drummer over towards his mike and shouted a few jokey comments about Moon trying to bottle out of finishing the gig. Soon afterwards, Daltrey also grabbed Moon and he and Townshend dragged him backwards towards his drums. Keith took all this in good part despite the fact that he obviously must have been feeling lousy.

With Moon seemingly ready to complete the performance, Pete picked up his Les Paul and began to tune it up. Soon after this The Who began playing 'Magic Bus', with Keith tapping together his two wood blocks. When he came to play the actual drums, however, he faltered once more, finally slumping forwards onto the kit amid a noisy climax in which Daltrey threw his mouth organ into the crowd. Roadies lifted Keith from the kit while Townshend started to play an improvised riff, Daltrey ad-libbing some singing. Then, without any interruptions, they moved directly into a drumless 'See Me, Feel Me', which was tightly paced, Daltrey using a tambourine to add some percussion. After the song had gained an overwhelming response, Townshend applauded the audience for putting up with a 75 per cent complete band.

Instead of leaving the stage, however, Pete - tentatively and jokingly - said: "Can anybody play the drums?" Then he repeated the question more forcefully, adding "I mean somebody good!" Soon afterwards Scott Halpin of Muscatine, Iowa, appeared on stage. After a roadie showed him to the kit, Townshend shook his hand and went straight into the riff of 'Smokestack Lightning'. This was a very loose arrangement, and Halpin's drum work fitted in well enough, and it shortly became 'Spoonful'. Less successful, however, was his contribution to the more complex 'Naked Eye', and he failed to provide the contrasting tempi despite Pete attempting to give him instructions. Halpin didn't look at all flustered and established a steady beat during the guitar solo. The second verse was missed entirely and Pete and Roger took turns to sing the final verse. Towards the end, Pete indulged in a mad spate of windmilled power-chords before the drawn-out "it don't really happen that way at all..." passage. Thus ended one of the most bizarre occurrences in the band's career. Pete later explained why they didn't leave the stage after 'Magic Bus': "When Keith collapsed, it was a shame. I had just been getting warmed up at that point. I'd felt closed up, like I couldn't let anything out. I didn't want to stop playing. It was also a shame for all the people who'd waited in line for eight hours" (Rolling Stone, January 4, 1974).

Halpin had bought a scalper's ticket to get into the show and suddenly found himself as a temporary member of The Who! Afterwards he enjoyed the post-show backstage hospitality with the group and then slipped back into obscurity. The incident was captured on camera and can be seen in the video Thirty Years Of Maximum R&B Live.

The Who had sold out all 13,500 seats in four hours three weeks prior to the concert. Lynyrd Skynyrd was the opening act for the entire tour. The whole concert was recorded on a crude 2-camera video system in B&W which was part of Bill Graham's personal archive.












San Francisco Examiner, Thursday, October 17, 1996:

WHO'S DRUMMER?
Teen got his 15 minutes of fame
SAM WHITING, Chronicle Staff Writer

Thomas Scot Halpin has the greatest rock concert story of them all. He went to see the Who andended up onstage as the band's drummer.

It was Nov. 20, 1973, at the Cow Palace, opening night of the "Quadrophenia'' tour. That notoriousshow was the last Bay Area performance of the rock opera until this weekend, when the band returnsto perform it in San Jose.

Nobody caught his name, but everybody remembers the skinny kid plucked from the audience toreplace the legendary Keith Moon -- the one-man lunatic fringe who went down that night likeconcrete, passed out at his drum kit.

Halpin, then 19, in low-slung bell-bottoms, tight T-shirt and mod haircut, coolly took the seat of hisidol, picked up the sticks and laid down the beat for three songs. Then he took a bow, arms aroundPete Town shend and Roger Daltrey, as if he had belonged there all along.

"For some reason it keeps coming up,'' says Halpin, who had scalped a ticket to the sold- out show."It's like one of the few times you could play royalty.'' In the documentary "The Who: Thirty Yearsof Maximum R&B,'' singer Daltrey recalled that when Moon collapsed for the second time thatnight, Townshend called out for a substitute. A sea of hands shot up and a line of drummers formedat the stage entrance for auditions.

This doesn't square with the way Halpin remembers it.

Now 42 and a painter, Halpin splits his time between San Francisco and Bloomington, Ind., wherehe was tracked down earlier this month for one more go- round of every teenage garage drummer'sfantasy.

The Who was the most drum- driven band in rock, with Moon an unorthodox showman who didflips and walked on his drums. He would pound the air and contort his face, but he never missed abeat.

Though his playing was erratic that night, a bootleg recording of the show indicates that Moon madeit through 70 minutes and all the Quadrophenia material, including "Bell Boy,'' his drum and vocalshowcase.

Then the band went into "Won't Get Fooled Again.'' Moon reared back to hit his cymbal and wentright off his stool.

`SUDDENLY THEY PULLED THE CORD'

"The guy was completely a locomotive, and then suddenly they pulled the cord. I thought it wasKeith Moon theatrics,'' recalls Halpin, who was watching from the side seats with Mike Danese, ahometown pal from Muscatine, Iowa, who now lives in Lafayette.

Two stagehands picked up the slumping drummer and carried him offstage, feet up. This also wasnot beyond Moon's sense of drama, but then the houselights went on.

Backstage it was determined that he had probably overdosed, possibly on PCP, or angel dust. Aninjection of cortisone got him back onstage after a 20-minute delay, but it wasn't long before he wentdown again.

When Townshend called out, "Can anyone play the drums?'' Halpin and Danese were already at theedge of the stage.

"And my friend starts saying to the security guard, `He can play,' '' Halpin says. In truth, he hadn'tplayed in a year, but that didn't slow the braggart Danese, who made such a commotion thatpromoter Bill Graham appeared. "He just looked at me and said, `Can you do it?' '' Halpin doesn'trecall his answer, but Danese assured Graham that he could.

"The story was that I stepped out from in front of the stage, but that's not what happened,'' Halpinsays. "Townshend and Daltrey look around and they're as surprised as I am,'' he says, "becauseGraham put me up there.''

With a shot of brandy for his nerves, Halpin shook hands with Townshend, then sat down at his firstdrum set since he left Iowa, in front of 13,500 critics. "I get onto the stool. Was it still warm? Whoknows. I'm in complete shock,'' Halpin says. "Then I got really focused, and Townshend said tome, `I'm going to lead you. I'm going to cue you.'

"I'm laying down the beat. They're doing all their `Live at Leeds' kind of stuff, and then I don'tremember what happened. I guess I played a couple more songs. It was such a weird experience.''

The bootleg reveals that Halpin drummed through the traditional "Smokestack Lightning'' and"Naked Eye,'' from "Odds and Sods,'' closing with the anthem "My Generation.'' He wasonstage for about 15 minutes. "I played long enough with them that no one booed and no one threwanything at the stage,'' he says.

PARTYING WITH DALTREY

Afterward he was invited backstage and managed to get Danese back there as well. They wereescorted into a party room, and Daltrey gave him a tour jacket and promised him he'd be paid$1,000. Danese recalls that "Daltrey was drinking Jack Daniel's straight out of the bottle.''

Halpin remembers mostly the buffet table. "We were about the last ones to go,'' he says, "becausewe're eating all this food and tak ing food with us.''

To do so he put down his souvenir tour jacket and sticks, and somebody snatched them. Then hedrove his Volkswagen Beetle back home to Monterey, woke up his girlfriend and told her the story.

He might have passed anonymously into lore, but pop critic John Wasserman put out an all- pointsbulletin in a column titled "Mystery Drummer Into the Breach,'' and the mystery drummerresponded. Then Townshend sent him a thank-you letter from Los Angeles, but it did not contain the$1,000 Daltrey had promised. -- perhaps his memory was clouded by that Jack Daniel. As a result ofhis fame, Halpin got an audition (but no job) with Journey, and Rolling Stone magazine named him"Pick-Up Player of the Year.''

The Who returned in 1976 for a series of shows at Winterland, and Halpin went down there to seeabout some unfinished business.

Again without a ticket, he waited four hours at the limo entrance until he found a way into the show.Afterward, he found Graham, who took him backstage to meet Moon.

The drummer was his old self, changing clothes in front of everyone, blathering nonsense. "He saidsomething, and I couldn't even figure out what it was,'' Halpin says. Like many Who purists,Halpin lost his heart for the band when a drug overdose finally killed Moon in September 1978.

When the Who documentary aired on PBS a few years ago, Halpin got his moment of screen time,though he wasn't mentioned by name. Somewhere in the Bill Graham Presents archives, a video ofthe whole show exists. Halpin would like to see that, to fill in the gaps in his memory. He'd also liketo see the paycheck Daltrey promised him.

"That's $1,000 plus interest,'' he says. "Let's figure it out.''




The Forum
Los Angeles, California
Thursday, November 22nd, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Wife
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Pinball Wizard
See Me, Feel Me
My Generation
Let's See Action
Magic Bus
Naked Eye
Baby Don't You Do It

The Concert File notes:

Keith was in better form for the LA shows and the group treated the first-night crowd to a rare event at a Who concert when they came back for an encore of 'Baby Don't You Do It'. Pete also smashed one of his numbered Gibson Les Paul Deluxe guitars. Chris Charlesworth reported in Melody Maker (December 8): "19,500 fans had stomped and cheered for over 15 minutes in the Forum, refusing to leave even though the house lights had been raised and probably well aware that The Who rarely do encores. But tonight their enthusiasm was rewarded with just that. The group came back and did an encore - actually 'Baby Don't You Do It' - only the second time I've seen this happen in watching The Who around 20 times... they blasted through the song, climaxing with Townshend unstrapping the Gibson and, gripping the fretboard as if it were an axe, bringing it down on to the stage with a resounding crash time and time again until it cracked around the 12th fret."






The Forum
Los Angeles, California
Friday November 23, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Wife
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Pinball Wizard
See Me, Feel Me
Magic Bus
Naked Eye



Sound Clips
from this show

Pete introduces Quadrophenia
File Size 2.2 mb
Sound type: MP3

The Real Me
File Size 839k
Sound type: MP3

Punk And The Godfather
File Size 1.1mb
Sound type: MP3

I'm One
File Size 1.5mb
Sound type: MP3

5:15
File Size 1.9mb
Sound type: MP3




The Concert File notes:

A second house of 19,000 witnessed Quadrophenia getting off at a cracking pace with 'The Real Me' and 'Punk And The Godfather'. Even the unusual structure of 'Helpless Dancer' retained an impact. Townshend introduced 'I'm One' by saying: "I don't know if you ever get the feeling that maybe there's always somebody else that's a little bit better looking than you, a little bit better dressed than you, a little bit smarter than you, a little bit more up to the minute than you, a little bit tougher... Well, this song's about the feeling that it doesn't matter what shape you are, or small you are, or out of date you are, of how significant one is - only royalty ever say 'one'... You're still... All right." He then gave up on the explanation and began the song. After 'Helpless Dancer', Daltrey said: "That song was basically about the frustrations that happen when you get mixed up with dirty things like politics... You needn't say that in the US of A. Anyway, from there the kid is very disillusioned and like a lot of kids still today, and when we were Mods - which we never really were - he runs away from home and he runs down to the seaside. He goes to Victoria Station - there was only trains in them days... '5.15'." There followed a powerful and energetic version of this song (which had not been released as a single in America), with some fine guitar work. Towards the end of the song, Moon's drums established a beat uncannily like that of a train slowing down and the clatter of the wheels on the tracks. Daltrey introduced 'Sea And Sand' but Pete found his guitar needed tuning, and he changed it for another.

Robert Hilburn had reservations in the Los Angeles Times (November 27): "The Who showed much of the power, precision and desire that made it one of rock's most rewarding and influential bands. But even the improved performance Friday didn't erase the troubling impression that the group's momentum - and therefore, importance - is waning..."







Memorial Auditorium
Dallas, Texas
Sunday November 25, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Wife
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Pinball Wizard
See Me, Feel Me

The Concert File notes:

The Dallas Morning News writer, Terry Kliewer, gave the show a one-word review of "WOW" before elaborating on a superb performance, but Roger thought differently. In an interview with the Washington Post (December 7) regarding the tour, Daltrey commented that The Who "only had one weak concert. Dallas". He didn't elaborate as to why this was the case but his judgement stands. Charles Perry and Andrew Bailey wrote in Rolling Stone (January 3 1974): "'Rock & roll!' cried one lone voice, as Peter Townshend continued to explain where the upcoming song fit in his latest rock opera. The Dallas Convention Center Arena is like the inside of a UFO, perfectly circular with concentric rings of lights in the ceiling. Down on the stage beneath 144 coloured spotlights The Who were walking the tightrope of their first tour in two years, trying to put across songs from their first album in as long. After the US dŽbut in San Francisco they'd decided the selections from Quadrophenia needed a bit of synopsis. The surprising thing is that only one cry of 'Rock & Roll!' split the air, to say nothing of the possible 'Boogie!', 'Party!' or 'Get it on!' Because the story of Quadrophenia is not the fairy tale triumph of a trebly-handicapped teenage guru... And only one voice shouted 'Rock & Roll!' Ten thousand college and high-school age Texans crowded the sold-out Arena November 25th to watch four men in their late twenties, including a singer and guitarist who are bywords for athleticism, perform powerful crashing music about... events in 1965, and their possibly misspent youth."







The Omni
Atlanta, Georgia
Tuesday November 27, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Wife
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Spoonful/Smokestack Lightning

The Concert File notes:

By this concert, the difficulties of Quadrophenia were becoming apparent. It wasn't just the technical problems involved in playing it, but the added difficulty of putting across the concept, story and characters. And to audiences unfamiliar with Mod, this was an uphill struggle at best. Both Roger and Pete's long explanations of the plot between the songs certainly seemed to divert the flow and intensity of the live act. Additionally, the backing tapes - especially on 'Bell Boy' and 'Dr. Jimmy' - never achieved the precision dovetailing that had been notable on 'Baba O'Riley' and 'Won't Get Fooled Again'. It must have somewhat disheartened Pete Townshend that the audiences invariably responded most warmly to the Tommy songs.






St. Louis Arena
St. Louis, Missouri
Wednesday November 28, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
My Generation
See Me Feel Me
Magic Bus
Pinball Wizard
Let's See Action
Naked Eye

The Concert File notes:

'Let's See Action', the British-only single from 1971, was being played live for the first time on a handful of dates on this tour. It took the form of a semi-improvised jam and the vocals were added in an equally casual way. The bridge section sung by Pete was always completely omitted. Also, this was one of the few US concerts where 'My Generation' was played twice.

The St. Louis concert was reviewed by Ken Barnes in Phonograph Record (January 1974): "For the most part The Who again proved peerless hard-rockers... Abetted by a much clearer sound than on the last tour... Quadrophenia... was, in a word, stunning. The concert rendition supplied all the raucous power seemingly latent in the storyline, and the added dimension invested the monolithic Quad with the true rock & roll excitement missing in large part from the album. The Who, especially Townshend, seemed genuinely enthusiastic playing the new material... and it showed in a galvanising performance. Inevitably the remainder of the concert was a trifle anticlimactic ... It was definitely reassuring to witness a 1973 Who triumph... The group's brand of hyperkinetic excitement hasn't faded away; and at their best, The Who are still, simply, the best."







International Amphitheater
Chicago, Illinois
Thursday November 29, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Encore unknown

The Concert File notes:

The Who sold out the Amphitheater over three weeks prior to the gig, grossing $87,000 in the process. Tickets were available through mail order only to avoid trouble at the box office. Later, Pete said he thought that this show and Montreal "were the two solidest performances" of the tour.

The Chicago Tribune (November 30) carried a review of this concert by Lynn Van Matre, who was among 12,000 fans who attended. She wrote: "Well, the highest energy rock band has come and gone. The Who arrived on stage at the Amphitheater last night in the usual way, lead singer Roger Daltrey's legs chugging like pistons, microphone twirling, Peter Townshend's guitar arm windmilling, Keith Moon manic on drums and John Entwistle minding his business on the bass. The din from the stage was incredible; the din from the audience matching that and then some... When it comes to rock theater, The Who must be the masters. No Alice Cooper theatrics needed, no props other than voices and the charge the group self-generates. With them it's all energy, transcending the music, transcending the scene. Harness 'em up, and they could probably transcend the energy crisis as well..." According to Van Matre, Pete sardonically referred to Quadrophenia as "a pot-boiler album we put together to please the industry and a long drawn-out piece of shit". She concluded: "They are, in the final analysis, pure, raw energy - which is, after all, what rock'n'roll's always been about."







Cobo Hall
Detroit, Michigan
Friday November 30, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Wife
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Pinball Wizard
Magic Bus
Naked Eye
Let's See Action

The Concert File notes:

This concert saw one of the stronger Quadrophenia performances, with the band feeling very comfortable with the Detroit audience. Daltrey acknowledged the city by referring to it as "our home from home in the USA" and went on to introduce 'My Wife' as The Who's favourite John Entwistle song. This performance careered along with the three instrumentalists playing flat out. Daltrey mentioned prior to 'My Generation' that Who fans in Detroit were the only Americans who bought the single when it was first released. 'Won't Get Fooled Again' was dedicated to those who had seen The Who play Tommy at Detroit's Grande Ballroom in May 1969 at the beginning of the first ground-breaking Tommy tour. The Who returned for an encore that began with 'Magic Bus' - received with great applause - which segued into 'Naked Eye'. The set closed with a loose version of 'Let's See Action', with the second verse being sung by Pete, and at the end of the chorus, Daltrey amended the lyric to "let's see who fucking cares".







The Forum
Montreal, Canada
Sunday December 2, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Wife
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Pinball Wizard
See Me Feel Me
Magic Bus

The Concert File notes:

A fine concert, which loosened up at an early stage when 'My Generation' developed into a formless jam. Townshend's introduction to 'I'm One' was met with some impatience: "It's all about - shut up for a minute and I'll tell you what it's all about - the song is all about a kid when he gets to that part of life when he feels he's just not worth a dime... It's like the fucking French Revolution. That's what they said in Chicago. They were crazier than you in Chicago. And after the show somebody said to me 'That was like the French Revolution.' And the promoter said 'You wait till you get to Montreal!'" This concert featured the last live performance of 'Helpless Dancer' which was subsequently dropped for the remainder of the tour. Again, the concert was dominated by the three epic length songs, '5.15', 'Sea And Sand' and 'Drowned', all explained by Daltrey. Keith Moon sang some of his 'Bell Boy' lines in French!

The Who celebrated their sell-out performance in Montreal with post show renovations to a suite at the Bonaventure Hotel which had been booked not to accommodate anyone in particular but simply to use for hospitality purposes. Unfortunately, the last person to leave left the lights on and the door ajar. This was spotted by a night porter who glanced inside and was horrified by the damage.

The police were summoned and The Who and 14 members of their entourage were arrested and jailed. Roger, who as usual had retired early to protect his throat and who'd played no part in the hotel destruction, was not best pleased. The following afternoon local promoter Donald K. Donald delivered $5,995.34 in cash to the police station and everyone was released at 1:15 pm. (John gave an amusing account of the incarceration in his song 'Cell Number 7' on The Ox's Mad Dog album in 1975.)

The episode caused the group to miss their scheduled flight to Boston but they eventually left at 4 pm in time for the show that night at Boston Garden.


Joe Giorgianni writes:

The show before "Cell Number 7." I don't have a lot of memories about it. I was a junior at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh which is about 50 miles south. I was a regular reader of Melody Maker and New Musical Express so I was pretty familiar with Quadrophenia and had listened to it quite a bit. It was during the gas shortage so I was quite concerned about being able to buy enough gasoline to make it to the show. My girlfriend drove up with my brothers and they picked my roommate Terry Hurlburt and me up. We were in the very back of the Forum. I was impressed that they had a quadrophonic sound system set up. That was all the rage back then and the first time I had seen one was the previous summer when I saw Pink Floyd on the "Dark Side of the Moon" tour.

There were also never any souvenirs or shirts to buy back then. I did see roadies wearing black sweatshirts with the yellow Fallout Shelter logo and would have loved one.

The lights went down and then you heard the sound of Keith checking out his drums. It sounded like thunder. The lights came up and Townshend was windmilling and Daltrey was twirling his mike to "I Can't Explain." I've always felt they should open their shows that way, not walk on and tune up the guitars, etc. I don't remember a lot about the show but I do remember them having trouble with the tapes. Still, hearing Quadrophenia back then was a very positive experience, much different than what was done in '96-97.

I had just received my college class ring and I do recall that after the show my hand was very sore from all the clapping I had done. I'm not one to get very excited at concerts or dance around or anything but this was the Who in their prime. To anyone that ever saw them without Moon and think they are just great - "I Can't Explain."







Boston Garden
Boston, Massachusetts
Monday December 3, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Wife
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Pinball Wizard
See Me Feel Me
Magic Bus
Naked Eye

The Concert File notes:

A crowd of 15,500 fans witnessed The Who venting their spleen against the Canadian police! Introducing 'My Wife', Pete Townshend mentioned that the band had spent all day in prison and that he had come to the conclusion that John Entwistle is a "rotten dirty criminal, and I don't like him!" An amazing level of energy was reached on 'The Real Me' and was maintained with 'Punk And The Godfather', although there was a brief pause between the two for Pete to retune his guitar. Talking of the Montreal police, he said "fuck their fucking arseholes" and added that he wished they were up on stage after seven hours in a police cell. However, prior to 'Drowned', Pete said - perhaps sarcastically - "I feel fucking incredible!" Townshend played an unaccompanied solo during 'Drowned' for a short while before the band picked up the song again. Daltrey later said: "About ten hours ago this gig was absolutely fucking impossible. So this one's for the filth - or whatever you like to call 'em - the police in Montreal. We're 'ere and it's good to be 'ere and this is for them: 'Won't Get Fooled Again'!"






The Spectrum
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Tuesday December 4, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Wife
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Pinball Wizard
See Me Feel Me


Sound Clips
from this show

Pete introduces Quadrophenia
File Size 2.4 mb
Sound type: MP3

I'm One
File Size 2.5mb
Sound type: MP3

Sea and Sand
File Size 2.5mb
Sound type: MP3

Drowned
File Size 4.7mb
Sound type: MP3


The Concert File notes:

A sell-out crowd of 19,500 packed the Spectrum for a gross of $135,000. The show was recorded for broadcast on the King Biscuit Flower Hour, as was the following night in Largo, Maryland. It was an edited version of this night's concert that was aired on Sunday March 31, 1974.

After a lengthy version of 'My Wife' followed by a superbly fast and hard performance of 'My Generation', which maintained its energy through seven minutes and some brilliant guitar soloing from Townshend, the Quadrophenia section of the show was less impressive. Pete said "The better part of an album what we wrote about ourselves being Mods, when we were little. The story about the Mod kid and we call it Quadrophenia... Being Mod meant a lot more in England I think than it ever did in America. I think you think of it being a Carnaby Street thing... And it's not just a looking back, it's a kind of bringing up to date. Quadrophenia's about where we all are today, maybe you too. The story is set on a rock in the middle of a stormy sea. In quadrophonic, as well!" Pete started playing a little too soon before the tape of 'I Am The Sea' had finished. Explaining 'I'm One', Pete said: "The next song is called 'I'm One', what I sing and it's all about the way I felt, 'cause I wrote it. When I was a nipper I always used to feel that the guitar was all I had... I wasn't tough enough to be in a gang, I wasn't good looking enough to be in with the birds, not clever enough to make it at school, not good enough on my feet to be a good football player, I was a fucking loser. I think everyone feels that way at some point. And somehow being a Mod - even though I was too old to be a Mod really - I wrote this song with that in mind. Jimmy, the hero of the story, is kinda thinking he hasn't got much going for himself but at least he's one."

'Sea And Sand' slowed down into a single guitar riff and built up again as Daltrey sang 'I'm The Face', and 'Drowned' featured some fine ensemble playing. 'Bell Boy' sounded rather clumsy but Keith Moon enlivened the song with his funny amendment of the lyric to "remember the place in Canada that we smashed". The average quality of the Quadrophenia performances was more than compensated for by 'Won't Get Fooled Again', a fine 'See Me, Feel Me' and 'Pinball Wizard'. Townshend introduced the latter as 'Pineball Blizzard!'. The radio broadcast omitted 'My Wife', 'Punk And The Godfather', '5.15', and 'Love Reign O'er Me'. The remaining show had the four-letter words in the announcements edited out, as well as from 'Dr. Jimmy', although Daltrey had slipped a "fucking" into the last verse of 'My Generation' which seemingly was broadcast unnoticed!

The 16-track mastertapes of this show (and Largo, below) have been carefully preserved by King Biscuit Flower Hour for future use, but The Who have always considered them unsuitable for release. Guitar destroyed: Gibson Les Paul Deluxe - cherry sunburst.







The Capital Center
Largo, Maryland
Thursday December 6, 1973




Set List:

I Can't Explain
Summertime Blues
My Wife
My Generation
I Am The Sea
The Real Me
Punk And The Godfather
I'm One
Helpless Dancer
5.15
Sea And Sand
Drowned
Bell Boy
Dr. Jimmy
Love Reign O'er Me
Won't Get Fooled Again
Pinball Wizard
See Me Feel Me

The Concert File notes:

This sell-out show before 17,500 fans was reviewed by Tom Zito of the Washington Post (December 7): "Perhaps because it was their last night on a long tour schedule, or because of a PA system that steadily distorted Roger Daltrey's rustic, raw vocals, or because the mammoth hall echoed the vocals and Pete Townshend's screaming guitar surges, The Who just didn't have the snap, crackle and pop and the sheer energy exuded in a 1970 summer concert at Columbia's Merriweather Post Pavilion that attracted a gate-trampling 20,000. The spirit seemed present in showmanship form, but not in musical content... musically this wasn't the old wild-but-precise Who... the band sounded tired and sloppy, almost like a second rate rock outfit trying to imitate The Who... There were occasional flashes of former glory: Townshend leaping across the entire stage, sounding the bridge chord to 'Won't Get Fooled Again' just as he touched down... But these were exceptions. And the audience, bat hed in huge klieg lights aimed out from the stage during the final overture from Tommy, clapped wildly, especially as Moon demolished his drum kit in old Who fashion - at least one Who fan last night felt the group to be only an echo of an old tidal wave."

The show was supposedly recorded by DIR Radio for broadcast on the King Biscuit Flower Hour but it was the previous night's concert that was broadcast on March 31, 1974. (That show was rebroadcast on the KBFH December 29, 1974.)